Location

Literally just across the street is the world famous Cagaloglu Hammam featured in 1,000 Places to See Before You Die by Patricia Schultz.

The hotel is tucked away on a quiet street and is just a few minutes walk to some of the world’s famous sites, The Blue Mosque, Hagia Sophia, Topkapi Palace and The Grand Bazaar. Agora Life Hotel has easy access to many restaurants and local shops.

Agora Life Hotel is a five minutes walk to the Sultanahmet Tram stop. The tram has connection to Ataturk Airport via Metro Line and Kabatas Füniküler Line to Taksim. Access to the Asian Side from Istanbul’s Marmaray Metro stop is a three minutes walk from the hotel. Guests who arrives to Ataturk Airport can use airport metro to Yenikapi where is connection stop to Marmaray metro line. The hotel is three minutes walk to Cagaloglu Marmaray stop.

Hotel provides free pickup for guests who book their rooms on this website and stay three and more nights.

Archaeology Museum

The site of the museums belonged to the Topkapi Palace outer gardens. The museum was founded by decree as the Imperial Museum in 1891. It was the first museum to feature Turkish Art. The first curator and founder of the museum was Osman Hamdi Bey. Since an Imperial decree protecting cultural goods in the Ottoman Empire was enforced, many governors from the provinces would send in found artifacts to the capital city. In that way the museum was able to amass a great collection. Upon its 100th anniversary in 1991, the museum received the European Council Museum Award, particularly for the renovations made to the lower floor halls in the main building and the new displays in the other buildings.

Ataturk Airport

Istanbul Ataturk Airport (IATA: IST, ICAO: LTBA) (Turkish: İstanbul Ataturk Havalimani) is the main International Airport serving Istanbul, Turkey (followed by Sabiha Gokcen International Airport) and the biggest airport in Turkey by total number of passengers. Opened in 1924 and located in Yeşilköy, on the European side of the city, it is 24 km (15 mi) west of the city centre. In 1980, the airport was renamed Ataturk International Airport in honor of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey. It served over 51 million passengers in 2013, making it the 17th busiest airport in the world in terms of total passenger traffic and the 10th busiest in the world in terms of international passenger traffic, ranking just below Munich Airport. It was Europe's 6th busiest airport in 2012, just below Amsterdam and Madrid.

Basilica Cistern

Located on the left side of the Haghia Sophia-Gülhane Park road in Sultanahmet, the Basilica Cistern is also known as Yerebatan place. It was built in approximately 540 A.D. by the Emperor justinianos I of the Byzantine Empire. A big square was dug underneath the ground and it was supported by 300 columns. At the time, it was the most important water storage area and provided water to the whole city The cistern was cleaned and renovated between 1985-1988 by the İstanbul Municipality. Today, it is open to visitors. Its exotic and unbelievable appearance makes the cistern an irresistible attraction.

Blue Mosque

After the Peace of Zsitvatorok and the unfavorable result of the war with Persia, Sultan Ahmet the First decided to build a big mosque in Istanbul to calm God. It would be the first imperial mosque for more than forty years. While his predecessors had paid for their mosques with their spoil of war, Ahmet the First had to remove the funds of the Treasury, because he had not gained remarkable victories. It caused the anger of oulémas, the Muslim jurists. The mosque must be built on the site of the palace of the Byzantine emperors, in front of the basilica Ayasofya (at that time, the mosque the most worshiped in Istanbul) and the racecourse, a site of a big symbolic meaning. Big parts of the south shore of the mosque rest on the foundations, the vaults of the old Grand Palace.

Cagaloglu Turkish Bath House

.Before the construction of Cağaloğlu Turkish Bath, the palace built by Nevşehirli Damat İbrahim Paşa stood on the same location. The palace was destroyed by a fire in 1740, and the Cağaloğlu Bath started being constructed on its site. It is of capital importance historically and today as it is the last great Turkish bath constructed before Sultan Mustafa III prohibited the construction of great baths in 1768 due to the increasing water and firewood needs of the city.

Dolmabahce Palace

Dolmabahce Palace was ordered by the Empire's 31st Sultan, Abdulmecid I, and built between the years 1843 and 1856. Haci Said Aga was responsible for the construction works, while the project was realized by architects Garabet Balyan, his son Nigogayos Balyan and Evanis Kalfa (members of the Balyan family of Ottoman court architects.) The design contains eclectic elements from the Baroque, Rococo and Neoclassical styles, blended with traditional Ottoman architecture to create a new synthesis. The palace layout and décor reflect the increasing influence of European styles and standards on Ottoman Culture and Art during the Tanzimat Period.

Grand Bazaar - Kapalicarsi

The Grand Bazaar is located inside the walled city of Istanbul, in the district of Fatih and in the neighbourhood bearing the same name. It stretches roughly from west to east between the mosques of Beyazit and of Nuruosmaniye. The Bazaar can easily be reached from Sultanahmet and Sirkeci by foot.The construction of the future Grand Bazaar's core started during the winter of 1455/56, shortly after the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople. SultanMehmet II had an edifice erected devoted to the trading of textiles. It was named Cevâhir Bedestan (‘Bedesten of Gems’) and was also known as Bezzâzistan-i Cedîd (‘New Bedesten’) in Ottoman Turkish. The word bedesten is adapted from the Persian word bezestan, derived from bez ("cloth"), and means "bazaar of the cloth sellers".The building – named alternately in Turkish İç (‘Internal’’), Atik (‘Ancien’), or Eski (‘Old’) Bedesten – lies on the slope of the third hill of Istanbul, between the ancient Fora of Constantine and of Theodosius. It was also near the first sultan's palace, the Old Palace (Eski Sarayi), which was also in construction in those same years, and not far from the Artopoléia (Άρτοπωλεία) quarter, a location already occupied in Byzantine times by the bakers.

Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom" is a former Greek Orthodox patriarchal basilica (church), later an imperial mosque, and now a museum in Istanbul, Turkey. From the date of its construction in 537 until 1453, it served as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral and seat of the Patriarchate of Constantinople, except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire. The building was a mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931. It was then secularized and opened as a museum on 1 February 1935. The church contained a large collection of holy relics and featured, among other things, a 15-metre (49 ft) silver iconostasis. The focal point of the Eastern Orthodox Church for nearly one thousand years, the building witnessed the excommunication of Patriarch Michael I Cerularius on the part of Pope Leo IX in 1054, an act which is commonly considered the start of the Great Schism. In 1453, Constantinople was conquered by the Ottoman Turks under Sultan Mehmed II, who ordered this main church of the Orthodox Christianity converted into a mosque. By this point, the Church had fallen into a state of disrepair. Nevertheless, the Christian cathedral made a strong impression on the new Ottoman rulers and they decided to convert it into a mosque. The bells, altar, iconostasis, and sacrificial vessels and other relics were removed and the mosaics depicting Jesus, his Mother Mary, Christian saints and angels were also removed or plastered over. Islamic features – such as the mihrab, minbar, and four minarets – were added. It remained a mosque until 1931 when it was closed to the public for four years. It was re-opened in 1935 as a museum by the Republic of Turkey.

Sultanahmet Square

The first of the seven hills on the promontory has been the most important and dynamic part of the city in all ages. When the city was first founded, the acropolis was a typical Mediterranean trading center surrounded by city walls. This trading center was enlarged and rebuilt during Roman times. The most prominent buildings and monuments of the Roman era were built in the vicinity of the Hippodrome. Very few relics of these works have endured to the present day. 

The imperial palace, known as the "Great Palace", used to spread over an area extending from the Hippodrome down to the seashore. Only the mosaic floor panel of a large hall remains from this palace today. The Augusteion, the most important square of the city, used to be here, and between the square and the main avenue there was the Millairium victory arch. The road used to extend as far as Rome and the stone marking the first kilometer was located here. The baths, temples, religious, cultural, administrative and social centers were all in this district. The area maintained its importance in the Byzantine and Turkish eras. Therefore some of the most important monuments of Istanbul such as the Hagia Sophia, Sultan Ahmet Mosque, the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Art and the Basilica Cistern are all located around the Hippodrome.

Topkapi Palace

The Topkapi Palace is a large palace in Istanbul that was the primary residence of the Ottoman Sultans for approximately 400 years (1465-1856). As well as a Royal Residence, The Palace was a setting for state occasions and Royal entertainments. It is now a major tourist attraction and contains important Holy Relics of the Muslim world, including Muhammed's SAW cloak and sword. The Topkapi Palace is among the monuments contained within the "Historic Areas of Istanbul", which became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985, and is described under UNESCO's criterion IV as "the best example[s] of ensembles of palaces of the Ottoman period. The palace complex consists of four main courtyards and many smaller buildings. At its peak, the palace was home to as many as 4,000 people, and covered a large area with a long shoreline. It contained mosques, a hospital, bakeries, and a mint. Construction began in 1459, ordered by Sultan Mehmed II, the Conqueror of Byzantine Constantinople. It was originally called the New Palace (Yeni Sarayi) to distinguish it from the previous residence. It received the name "Topkapi" (Cannon Gate) in the 19th century, after a (now lost) gate and shore pavilion. The complex was expanded over the centuries, with major renovations after the 1509 earthquake and the 1665 fire. After the 17th century the Topkapi Palace gradually lost its importance as the sultans preferred to spend more time in their new palaces along the Bosphorus. In 1856, Sultan Abdul Mecid I decided to move the court to the newly built Dolmabahce Palace, the first European-style palace in the city. Some functions, such as the imperial treasury, the library, and the mint, were retained in the Topkapi Palace.

Turkish and Islamic Arts Museum

The Turkish and Islamic Arts Museum (Turkish: Turk ve Islam Eserleri Muzesi) is a museum located in Sultanahmet Square in Fatih district of Istanbul, Turkey. Constructed in 1524, the building was formerly the palace of Pargali Ibrahim Pasha, who was the first grand vizier to Suleiman the Magnificent, and husband of the Sultan's sister, Hatice Sultan. The collection includes notable examples of Islamic calligraphy, tiles, and rugs as well as ethnographic displays on various cultures in Turkey, particularly nomad groups. These displays recreate rooms or dwellings from different time periods and regions.